Friday, July 5, 2013

around the farm



The peas never make it into the house - we've been eating them fresh off the vine - so sweet and tender! (and so 'num! as the little girl says).



The cream from our goat's milk is so very sweet and makes the best butter. I've also been experimenting with some very simple cheeses; Chèvre using lemon juice (which the first time turned out more like crumbles, but still tasty with chives and garlic scapes mixed in), and ricotta using apple cider vinegar. And I never knew there were so many uses for whey!


Speaking of the goats, Spring is quite a tough ol' gal, and has determined she will be herd Queen. More power to her.



There seems to be an explosion of bunnies (not good for the garden) and many of my beautiful greens growing in barrels were ravished by something overnight. My michilini cabbage is totally ruined, along with my short-term plans for kimchi. But I did manage to harvest all the bok choy and some of the mustard greens before the destruction. Our new favorite way to eat bok choy is stir fried with a little garlic, sugar, and fish sauce.

My larger garden is in a sad state, save for the potatoes, garlic (almost ready to harvest!), and onions. The tomato, pepper, and cucumber plants are s...l...o...w to grow this year. And all my poor squash seedlings died before I could plant them out. I'm consoling myself with the fact that I grew a baby this year instead of a good garden. Oh well. I do have a cousin-in-law who looks to have a bountiful harvest in her suburban garden, so I plan to trade my eggs for her produce.


I think this might be a duck egg! It made delicious braided bread.

The meat birds have all been harvested, and I'm thinking about re-seeding the outdoor run attached to the chicken barn (now wonderfully fertilized!) with kale and pumpkins.

What's growing in your space? Certainly you must be doing better than I am!




12 comments:

  1. Oh yes, indeed... growing a bay is MUCH more important!!!! Never mind, there's always next year. Babe will be on a regular nap schedule and You'll have some guaranteed time in the garden each day :) For now - seed the whole garden in mixed cover crop and call it The Year Of The Soil (just be sure to cut it all back before it seeds!). Do the same again in fall with winter rye. Your soil will be amazing next year!

    Absolutely, barter for produce, Jaime. There's always the farmer's market as well (if you have one reasonably nearby) or you could even buy direct from a local producer.

    Hugs - REST and love up the babe - it will go so fast...


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  2. Replies
    1. I'd actually like to grow some bay, too ;)

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  3. It is a super slow growing season. I think my peppers are an inch higher than they were when they were seedlings that I planted 6 weeks ago. And I replanted some squash, but I think I mixed the hills and now I'm not sure what is growing where. Oh well. I agree with little girl! Num, Num on the peas!

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  4. Jaime, I am so enjoying your blog! Your pictures are so sweet, and your babies are beautiful! I so admire your hard work on the farm. We tried growing a big vegetable garden back home in Texas, but it was a miserable failure. Maybe I'll have better luck in Colorado? I am adding you to my favorite blogs. I look forward to visiting the farm again soon! Blessings to you and yours! -Lisa :)

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  5. Such pretty glimpses! We are certainly doing no better.. Between the nonstop rain and random scorching hot days, out garden is days off of its final breath. Also? We mulched with composted wood chips that I believe now were not composted at all. Too much acid. Next year it'll be a good spot..I hope? And yes! You grew a baby! Kate (longest acres) recently said this year would not be the year of the garden, it would be the year of the baby, and that was OK. Truer words have never been spoken. Good luck with it all! xo

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  6. When did that little girl of yours get so big? Such a sweet pic of her...ours never make it inside either!
    I think your doing so well considering you have grown a little bubba....it will all come back in time!

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  7. Beautiful peeks at your world! What I can see of your garden looks successful. We are also having a slow year because of baby. I can barely keep up with picking everything that has been kind enough to grow for us :) Those cheeses sound so good too!
    xox Lilly

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  8. What a lovely blog post - I enjoyed a little peek into your world.
    It must be so wonderful to keep animals and have all of the milk and eggs. One day, maybe, I will find out.
    I love those little embroidered bees, too!
    Peas are just beginning to flower and pod here but I have lots of swiss chard growing and am hoping for a good crop of courgettes and tomatoes (my first time for tomatoes). This weekend we're digging up our potatoes, too.

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  9. My garden is just getting exciting due to a move and colder weather than average, but it's all very exciting just the same! The other day I was able to snag plenty of the usual firsts...radishes and lettuce--delicious. I brought on chickens this week too--three little gals I'm thrilled to have chirping away in their box.

    Thanks for sharing, especially your cheese trials--Best wishes and keep enjoying summertime!

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  10. Its been a terrible year for us with peppers and tomatoes. Slow to grow and many didn't even grow past a couple inches! It make me sad as they are probably my favorite of our crops.

    We noticed our friendly front yard rabbit now has a couple friends. We hope the first rabbit has told them we have a truce!

    Always busy on the farm, right?!

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  11. Oh, and how did I forget:
    Goat cheese is the best cheese there is. I bet super-fresh makes it even more mouth-meltingly delicious!

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