Monday, March 5, 2012

beginning

The beginning of March and the nearing of spring has begun! And that means I can (slowly and with much restraint) start some indoor seeds! First up are the onions, which will be closely followed by the chives and parsley.


I've noticed some beginnings out-of-doors, too:

new strawberry leaves
rhubarb poking up


an onion that escaped last year's harvest
green! in the unfrozen pond

I wanted to share a few useful planting links with you (which are also listed on the sidebar for quick reference):

Date of Last Frost Calculator

Date of Last Frost by Zip Code

Planting Guide Calendar

For us in Colorado, Memorial Day (at the end of May) is the safest bet for first outdoor plantings, but according to the calculator, there's a decent chance we can safety plant around May 15th. Colorado's outdoor growing season is about 150 days.

My new seed potatoes should be arriving soon, and I can hopefully start preparing the ground for their planting less than a month from now!

Are you beginning, too?

(P.S. The ducks are decidedly not beginning to warm up to me.)

22 comments:

  1. Oh, Jamie, I'm so happy for you! There's nothing like the hopeful promise of planting those first seeds of the year... I'm a little envious :)

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  2. I've got onions on my to-do list, too. I'm trying hard not to jump the gun with other varieties.

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  3. Hello Jamie...I didn't realize what a big difference there was in our growing season. I know you are following my blog from all the wonderful comments you make. So, you know, my potatoes have been in the grown for two weeks. They were breaking ground just a few days ago. I'll be watching and reading your blog to see your growing progress. I love all your photographs....your baby is so sweet!

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  4. I'm waiting for the days to be a little longer before I start seed planting... though my overwintering garlic and shallots made it through the winter!

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    1. Yay! I'm trying not to worry about my garlic - i don't see any shoots yet (although it was planted a bit late)...

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  5. The ducks are funny! :)
    I started my tomato, pepper and eggplant seeds just last week. I usually wait until Mother's Day weekend to set them out in the garden and to plant the squash and bean seeds.
    Spring will be here before you know it!

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  6. Start my seeds too, Jaime! We have the same last frost date here. Exciting time of the year, isn't it?

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  7. I have started one flat so far. Our average last frost date is similar here in Wisconsin. It's hard to restrain myself :)

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  8. I love seeing seeds popping up indoors and out. Waiting patiently for spring.

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  9. Our last frost date is about the same or a tad bit later over here in Washington. I've held off and only planted my peppers although I meant to plant my onion seeds over the weekend too, so I'll have to try and get that done in the next couple days. The start of spring is so exciting! :)

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  10. Thank you for the wonderful planting links--I'm adding them to our favorites. Michigan is still covered in snow, but our temps are rising a bit today and I'm hopeful that the maple sap will start flowing again. Have a wonderful week!

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  11. Our seedling nursery will be set up this week. Hooray! It is hard not too get too excited too fast about the garden in the early spring, isn't it. Especially when it is so gosh darn nice out (at least it has been here and judging from the photos I'd say there too)!

    Such an exciting time of year, so full of hopes and dreams and promise.

    That is a great duck action shot...even if they do spring to action just because you are there to photograph!

    Have a wonderful day!

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  12. I started my onions by seed in the ground last year and was pleasantly surprised that I got as many as I did. This week I dug up some more carrots for the dogs and will need to get the rest out of the ground so I can turn in some compost and last years leaves before planting my spring crops. The weather today has made me itch to dig in the dirt, but knowing what is coming tomorrow is just a slap in the face!

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  13. Well... I fear I lack the patience gene, so I started the cool weather seedlings back in January and they are ready to transplant soon. They always say that here in Denver you should have the spinach and peas, and other cool weather stuff in the ground by St. Patrick's Day. I planted my spinach last fall and wintered it over (like I do every year) and it's already producing nicely. I've got chives and scallions already peaking their heads up... they just come back year after year. The chives I harvest by just cutting them, and the scallions I sort of have a "throw the small ones back" policy which has kept them going for about 5 years now. The garlic is coming up too.

    I have trouble getting the potatoes to mature so I've already got mine in the "ground." I put that in quotes because I'm trying a radical new idea this year and planting them in containers on the south side of the house. I always seem to destroy at least a third of the harvest by skewering the potatoes with the pitchfork when I'm digging them up, so I read about people growing them in containers... makes it easy to add dirt to "mound" them, and at harvest time you just dump them over and sift through the dirt... in theory anyhow!

    I've never tried real onions before... but I think I have some seeds hanging around... perhaps I'll try starting some inside. It's just about time to start the tomatoes, peppers, eggplants and cucumbers too. I generally start them in March then wait and see what the weather looks like. Sometimes I put them in the ground as early as April (with wall-o-waters), other years not until June, and it all seems to work out. I figure it's all an in-exact science anyhow!

    I'm so excited I can barely contain myself (you couldn't tell, could you?) :~)

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    1. I grew potatoes in barrels last year, and it worked great!

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    2. oooooo... barrels! That's a wonderful idea! Wonder where I can get some free/cheap!

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  14. So fun reading about everyone's plans and beginnings! Thanks for sharing :)

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  15. How exciting! With such a mild winter, I am tempted to start seeding things I probably shouldn't (tomatoes, mainly!). Restraint is so hard to come by.

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  16. We're in the same boat as you here. About 150 growing days, with mid May being "safe" though not guaranteed to be frost free. I can hardly wait! I've started some seeds, but have tried my best to hold out a bit longer...there's only so much space under the grow lights! BTW-I am completely jealous of your peaking rhubarb! Ours hasn't shown itself yet.

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  17. yes yes... around our home too... the strawberries and rhubarb that I'm trying to keep the chickens from eating!!! :) great post!

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  18. I've always wanted to grow potatoes is it tricky?

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